A hard-line method of cardiovascular risks in diabetes When treating the diabetes patient.

A hard-line method of cardiovascular risks in diabetes When treating the diabetes patient, doctors discussed how a ‘one size fits almost all’ method of testing is not enough to reveal a person’s risk for cardiovascular disease Saturday in the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists 18th Annual Meeting & Clinical Congress. ‘We need to be more intense in treating our individuals,’ Howard S. Weintraub, MD, a cardiologist and Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine at NYU Medical School, said. ‘This involves individualized screening and early intervention.’ Related StoriesBariatric surgery improves pounds, metabolic health and standard of living in adolescents after 3 yearsNew Cleveland Clinic study shows bariatric surgery is safe choice for managing type 2 diabetes in obese or mildly obese patientsStudy finds high prevalence of dehydration in the elderly living in UK care homesWeintraub recommended that while gathering a patient’s bloodstream sugar data is essential, assessing their outcomes on a person basis is crucial.The baseline features were related among the procedure groups . Nearly all patients were males, and the mean age was 48.1 years. Whites accounted for 77 percent of the analysis population . Most sufferers had HCV RNA levels of 800,000 IU or more per milliliter at baseline. Efficacy The sustained virologic response price was 61 percent in the T12PR24 group, in comparison with 41 percent in the PR48 group . Rates of sustained virologic response had been 67 percent in the T12PR48 group and 35 percent in the T12PR12 group . In the small subgroup of black individuals enrolled in the scholarly study, prices of sustained virologic response had been 11 percent in the PR48 group and 44 percent in the telaprevir-based groupings. Rates of rapid virologic response were higher with telaprevir-based therapy than without it all .